Tuesday, December 28, 2010

Roman Calendar Widget

For more information, see the Roman Calendar Reference Page.



15 comments:

Caillaud Pascal said...

This Roman calendar widget is very great and I installed it on my google calendar. But it stops at 31 December 2013. How can it continue after this date in 2014, 2015 ... ?

Caillaud Pascal said...

This Roman calendar widget is very great and I installed it on my google calendar. But it stops at 31 December 2013. How can it continue after this date in 2014, 2015 ... ?

Mama Fortuna said...

Is there some way we can help keep this Roman calendar widget continuous from year to year?

Laura Gibbs said...

Alas, only if we get rid of leap year. Every year in December, I load up the new calendar for the next year based on whether it will be a leap year or not.

Mama Fortuna said...

I'm wondering, does it take a lot of work each year? Or, are there simply two different versions of the calendar? How can I help?

Laura Gibbs said...

It's not hard, although people sure do argue about how to do leap years in Roman calendar, ha ha.

Mama Fortuna said...

I'm guessing there was no such thing as Feb 29?

Laura Gibbs said...

Gory details here:
Leap Year ... it's very much about who gets to decide how to represent leap years in the absence of actual Romans. I prefer to just apply the same "counting-backwards" rule so that Feb. 29 is the pridie before the Calends of March. Others disagree. :-)

Mama Fortuna said...

It's your calendar, and I don't see anyone else creating a Roman calendar widget. Can it be set once, and then just go forward? Or does it need resetting every year, or every four years?

Laura Gibbs said...

The script is perpetual.
http://schoolhousewidgets.blogspot.com/2010/12/roman-calendar-script.html
And just pondering this conversation, I think I will leave it like that, which means that for February 29 there will be no special display. I won't go in and update it anymore for leap year. We can save everybody that grief, ha ha.

Mama Fortuna said...

That sounds like a great idea! Historically accurate, since the Gregorian calendar did not reflect the Pagan holidays, and much easier for the one who created the widget :)

Mama Fortuna said...

Noticed the widget was still down, and researched your comment about "counting backwards" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julian_calendar#Julian_reform). Whomever edits Wikipedia suggests that:

"...In 238 Censorinus stated that it (a second day in the "annus bissextus") was inserted after the Terminalia (23 February) and was followed by the last five days of February... (which would be 24 to 28 February in a common year and the 25th to 29th in a leap year)."

It appears that the arguments surround details about the two days. Now I wonder if the widget could be perpetual on a four-year cycle? What can we do to help keep the widget working?

Laura Gibbs said...

The tool I used to make the widget is this one: RotateContent.com. You can make any kind of calendar widget with that free tool; it's what I use for the cats and such too. it creates random scripts and also calendar ones.This weekend I will just put up a perpetual one and skip the whole leap year problem since it is really not of any interest to me personally, and it is leap year that means I cannot just do a perpetual calendar. Someone with an interest in leap year can do a different one maybe! But, like I said, it's not on my list of things to worry about... much less to bring grief into other people's lives because they want Roman leap year done differently... :-)

Mama Fortuna said...

Great widget, thanks for sharing :) Good luck with the weekend updates!

Mama Fortuna said...

Here's an idea, which might serve accuracy until some tech person can create a program that is continuous on a five-year cycle:

Why not manually note the leap year dates below the regular year dates, along with the words "annus bissextus"?

So, the entry for each day, of those last few days in February:

"holiday(in Latin language)"

"leap year holiday (in Latin language) annus bissextus "

It's not clear to me, whether the calendar program automatically adds that 29th day every fourth year ("ante diem bis sextum Kalendas Martias") or not.

Since the Romans didn't have computers, and since many ancient documents such as Ovid's fasti are fragmented or incomplete, it's difficult to say exactly how the situation would have been handled in antiquity.